NPS Free Admission Day - National Park Service Birthday
Aug
25
2:00 pm14:00

NPS Free Admission Day - National Park Service Birthday

Free Entrance Days in the National Parks

Fee-free days make national parks accessible to more people. 

The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page

NPS Free Admission Day - National Public Lands Day
Sep
30
2:00 pm14:00

NPS Free Admission Day - National Public Lands Day

Free Entrance Days in the National Parks

Fee-free days make national parks accessible to more people. 

The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page

NPS Free Admission Day - Veterans Day Weekend
Nov
11
Nov 12

NPS Free Admission Day - Veterans Day Weekend

Free Entrance Days in the National Parks

Fee-free days make national parks accessible to more people. 

The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page


National Parks Free Entrance Day - Weekends of National Park Week
Apr
22
Apr 23

National Parks Free Entrance Day - Weekends of National Park Week

Free Entrance Days in the National Parks

Fee-free days make national parks accessible to more people. 

The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page

Weekends of National Park Week
Apr
15
Apr 16

Weekends of National Park Week


The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page.

National Walk to Work Day
Apr
7
10:00 am10:00

National Walk to Work Day

Walking to work, who does that anymore? We know with all the rushing around you have to do Walking to work, who does that anymore? We know with all the rushing around you have to do and hitting the snooze button 5 times before crawling out of bed and barely getting there on time in the car… who has time to WALK to work? Well Walk to Work Day is a chance to change up your routine, add a little more time to it, and see how a slower start to your day can lead to a more efficient life overall. In this age of growing awareness about how being sedentary effects our health, walking to work can make a huge difference in our lives, and our lifespans.

History of Walk To Work Day
Of course, the heart of Walk to Work Day isn’t just based in our physical and emotional health, but actually concerns itself with the health of the planet as a whole. Prevention magazine promoted this holiday in 2004 and it was quickly picked up by the US Department of Health and Human services. It was a strong mutual push for this holiday in the years to follow, and continues to be celebrated and supported unofficially my people everywhere.
Walking to work provides amazing health benefits to the otherwise sedentary person. The extra time necessary to walk to work helps wake you up and spend time clearing your head and greeting the day in something less than a rush. In a world where we so often forget that there’s more to life than working and sleeping, this extra time can help us take time to appreciate the things we usually miss. Whether it’s just the feel of the wind on our skin, the sun overhead, the rain falling down, the sound of birds or just the activity and life of the city around us, Walk to Work Day helps to reconnect us with our environment in some very important ways.

How to Celebrate Walk to Work Day

Set the car keys down, set the alarm early, pack yourself a breakfast you can eat on the go, and plot your route. Those are the first steps to your Walk to Work Day experience. After that, you might want to grab a second set of shoes to throw in your bag so you aren’t trying to walk in heels or dress shoes, both of those are just going to lead to a day of woe for you with blisters the size of pancakes. If it’s particularly warm out, you might even pack your work clothes into your bag and give yourself a little extra time to change when you get there. Walk to Work Day helps you reduce carbon emissions, add some healthy movement to your day, and generally appreciate the world around you more. So get out there and get to steppin’!and hitting the snooze button 5 times before crawling out of bed and barely getting there on time in the car… who has time to WALK to work? Well Walk to Work Day is a chance to change up your routine, add a little more time to it, and see how a slower start to your day can lead to a more efficient life overall. In this age of growing awareness about how being sedentary effects our health, walking to work can make a huge difference in our lives, and our lifespans.

History of Walk To Work Day
Of course, the heart of Walk to Work Day isn’t just based in our physical and emotional health, but actually concerns itself with the health of the planet as a whole. Prevention magazine promoted this holiday in 2004 and it was quickly picked up by the US Department of Health and Human services. It was a strong mutual push for this holiday in the years to follow, and continues to be celebrated and supported unofficially my people everywhere.
Walking to work provides amazing health benefits to the otherwise sedentary person. The extra time necessary to walk to work helps wake you up and spend time clearing your head and greeting the day in something less than a rush. In a world where we so often forget that there’s more to life than working and sleeping, this extra time can help us take time to appreciate the things we usually miss. Whether it’s just the feel of the wind on our skin, the sun overhead, the rain falling down, the sound of birds or just the activity and life of the city around us, Walk to Work Day helps to reconnect us with our environment in some very important ways.Walking to work, who does that anymore? We know with all the rushing around you have to do and hitting the snooze button 5 times before crawling out of bed and barely getting there on time in the car… who has time to WALK to work? Well Walk to Work Day is a chance to change up your routine, add a little more time to it, and see how a slower start to your day can lead to a more efficient life overall. In this age of growing awareness about how being sedentary effects our health, walking to work can make a huge difference in our lives, and our lifespans.

History of Walk To Work Day
Of course, the heart of Walk to Work Day isn’t just based in our physical and emotional health, but actually concerns itself with the health of the planet as a whole. Prevention magazine promoted this holiday in 2004 and it was quickly picked up by the US Department of Health and Human services. It was a strong mutual push for this holiday in the years to follow, and continues to be celebrated and supported unofficially my people everywhere.
Walking to work provides amazing health benefits to the otherwise sedentary person. The extra time necessary to walk to work helps wake you up and spend time clearing your head and greeting the day in something less than a rush. In a world where we so often forget that there’s more to life than working and sleeping, this extra time can help us take time to appreciate the things we usually miss. Whether it’s just the feel of the wind on our skin, the sun overhead, the rain falling down, the sound of birds or just the activity and life of the city around us, Walk to Work Day helps to reconnect us with our environment in some very important ways.

How to Celebrate Walk to Work Dayow to Celebrate Walk to Work Day

Set the car keys down, set the alarm early, pack yourself a breakfast you can eat on the go, and plot your route. Those are the first steps to your Walk to Work Day experience. After that, you might want to grab a second set of shoes to throw in your bag so you aren’t trying to walk in heels or dress shoes, both of those are just going to lead to a day of woe for you with blisters the size of pancakes. If it’s particularly warm out, you might even pack your work clothes into your bag and give yourself a little extra time to change when you get there. Walk to Work Day helps you reduce carbon emissions, add some healthy movement to your day, and generally appreciate the world around you more. So get out there and get to steppin’!

National Walking Day
Apr
5
9:30 am09:30

National Walking Day

Get Up and Move!

These days, we’re spending more time at work and sitting in front of a screen than ever before. We're becoming less active, which can increase our risk of heart disease, stroke and other diseases.

Take the first step to a healthier life by taking part in the American Heart Association's National Walking Day. On the first Wednesday in April, we kick off a month-long celebration designed to help us all become more active. On the day of the event, participants are encouraged to lace up their sneakers and take 30 minutes out of their day to get up and walk.

We provide a complete toolkit of educational and promotional materials for workplaces, schools, individuals and communities


What is National Walking Day?

The first Wednesday in April is National Walking Day. The American Heart Association sponsors this day to remind people about the health benefits of taking a walk. Wear your sneakers (or take them with you) to work and at some point in the day, you are encouraged to take a 30-minute walk.



 

NATIONAL TAKE A WALK IN THE PARK DAY
Mar
30
9:30 am09:30

NATIONAL TAKE A WALK IN THE PARK DAY

National Take A Walk In The Park Day is observed annually on March 30th.  After a long busy day, a calming and therapeutic way to relax would be a nice, leisurely walk in the park.

Taking a walk at a local park is definitely a good way to clear one’s mind from the stresses of the day, re-energize yourself and at the same time, help to improve your health.

Make sure you take a camera with you during your walk as parks offer many opportunities to photograph nature. There is the possibility of capturing some great pictures of birds or other wildlife, flowers, budding trees, clouds or the sunset.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Go out for a walk in the park. Enjoy nature’s beauty and being outside. Use #TakeAWalkInTheParkDay to post on social media.

HISTORY

Our research was unable to find the creator and the origin of National Take A Walk In The Park Day, an unofficial national holiday.

 

National Day of Unplugging
Mar
3
9:00 am09:00

National Day of Unplugging

Do you have multiple cell phones? Take your ipad to the beach on vacation? Ever find it hard to get through a conversation without posting an update to Facebook? Is your computer always on?

We increasingly miss out on the important moments of our lives as we pass the hours with our noses buried in our iPhones and BlackBerry’s, chronicling our every move through Facebook and Twitter and shielding ourselves from the outside world with the bubble of “silence” that our earphones create.

If you recognize that in yourself – or your friends, families or colleagues— join us for the National Day of Unplugging, sign the Unplug pledge and start living a different life: connect with the people in your street, neighborhood and city, have an uninterrupted meal or read a book to your child.

The National Day of Unplugging is a 24 hour period – running from sundown to sundown – and starts on the first Friday in March. The project is an outgrowth of The Sabbath Manifesto, an adaption of our ancestors’ ritual of carving out one day per week to unwind, unplug, relax, reflect, get outdoors, and connect with loved ones.

Who’s behind this?

The National Day of Unplugging is a project of Reboot. Reboot affirms the value of Jewish traditions and creates new ways for people to make them their own. Inspired by Jewish ritual and embracing the arts, humor, food, philosophy, and social justice, we produce creative projects that spark the interest of young Jews and the larger community. Among our productions are events, exhibitions, recordings, books, films, DIY activity toolkits, and apps. Since our inception, 480 network members, 700 community organization partners, and hundreds of thousands of people have looked to Reboot to rekindle connections and re-imagine Jewish lives full of meaning, creativity, and joy.

Questions?

Contact Josh Kanter (josh@rebooters.net), Outreach and Partnership Manager, Reboot.

For Press Inquires contact Tanya Schevitz (tanya@rebooters.net, 415-322-0981), Communications Manager, Reboot.

National Parks Free Entrance Day - Presidents' Day
Feb
20
2:00 pm14:00

National Parks Free Entrance Day - Presidents' Day

Free Entrance Days in the National Parks

Fee-free days make national parks accessible to more people. 

The National Park Service just turned 100 years old! Celebrate the start of our second century by visiting a park in 2017. During ten days of the year, all National Park Service sites that charge an entrance fee will offer free admission to everyone.

Mark your calendar for these entrance fee–free dates in 2017:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day
February 20: Presidents' Day
April 15-16 and 22-23: Weekends of National Park Week
August 25: National Park Service Birthday
September 30: National Public Lands Day
November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

National parks are America’s Best Idea, and there are more than 400 parks available to everyone, every day. The fee-free days provide a great opportunity to visit a new place or an old favorite, especially one of the 120 national parks that normally charge an entrance fee. The others are free all of the time. Plan your visit and enjoy our country’s history and nature.

The fee waiver includes entrance fees, commercial tour fees, and transportation entrance fees. Other fees such as reservation, camping, tours, concession and fees collected by third parties are not included unless stated otherwise.
Fee-free days make parks accessible to more people. However, national parks are always economical, with entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. In addition, any fourth grade student can get a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program, and active duty military and citizens with a permanent disability can also get free passes. For more information about the variety of discounted passes available, please visit the America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass page

Santa Fe National Forest To Host Another Round of Public Meetings on Forest Plan Revision
Jan
30
6:00 pm18:00

Santa Fe National Forest To Host Another Round of Public Meetings on Forest Plan Revision

Santa Fe National Forest To Host Another Round of Public Meetings on Forest Plan Revision

Release Date: Jan 12, 2017  

Contact(s): Julie Anne Overton

 

 

SANTA FE, NM – Jan. 12, 2017 – For Immediate Release.  The Santa Fe National Forest (SFNF) will host 10 public meetings and a two-day technical meeting between Jan. 17 and Feb. 9, 2017, as part of the multi-year effort to revise the comprehensive plan that will guide forest management, use and protection for the next 10 to 15 years.

This round of public meetings will give members of the public an opportunity to discuss and comment on initial plan components and the draft wilderness evaluation maps.

Initial plan components have been drafted for all resource areas, including vegetation, fire and fuels, wildlife, water and soil resources, air quality, traditional and cultural ways of life, cultural resources and archaeology, forest products, range and grazing, recreation, roads and infrastructure, energy and minerals, lands and realty, scenic resources and designated areas.

“Based on the 2012 directives that guide land management planning on all national forests, the Santa Fe National Forest is committed to listening to our stakeholders, developing creative approaches to meet a wide range of interests, and building a plan for the long term,” Acting Forest Supervisor Joe Norrell said.  “Public input is a key part of that strategy and is already reflected in our initial plan components.”

As part of the 2012 planning rule, forests are required to identify lands that may or may not be suitable to recommend to Congress for wilderness designation as part of the revision of their management plan.  The four-step wilderness process includes:

  • the inventory of lands to be evaluated for wilderness characteristics
  • the evaluation of the areas based on characteristics outlined in the Wilderness Act of 1964, including naturalness, size, opportunities for solitude or primitive recreation, manageability and special features
  • analysis of areas to be considered in the plan alternatives, including their social and economic contributions to communities
  • recommendations for inclusion in the National Wilderness Preservation System

The SFNF will share draft wilderness evaluation maps for public comment at the upcoming meetings.  “It is important to remember that the draft evaluation maps are our first cut at the evaluation, and public input will help us complete the evaluation and determine which areas will move forward to the analysis phase,” Norrell said.

The forest plan revision public meetings will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the following dates and at the following locations:

Jan. 17, 2017

Pojoaque Middle School
Sixth Grade Academy

1797 NM-502
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Jan. 18, 2017

Mora Independent School
School Board Room

10 Ranger Rd.
Mora, NM 87732

Jan. 19, 2017

Bernalillo High School
High School Cafeteria

148 Spartan Alley
Bernalillo, NM 87004

Jan. 23, 2017

Coronado High School
High School Auditorium

State Hwy 96 #1903
Gallina, NM87017

Jan. 24, 2017

Santa Fe Convention Center
Coronado Room

201 W Marcy St.
Santa Fe, NM 87501

Jan. 26, 2017

Jemez Madonna Hall

0040 Legion Dr. HWY 4
Jemez Springs, NM 87025

Jan. 30, 2017

Cuba Fair Grounds

Sandoval County Fairgrounds
37 Rodeo Rd, Cuba, NM 87013

Feb. 1, 2017

Santa Fe Community College
Jemez Rooms

6401 Richards Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87508

Feb. 2, 2017

Rio Arriba Cooperative Extension Office
Conference Room

State Road 554 House #122-A
El Rito, NM 87530

Feb. 9, 2017

Pecos High School
School Board Rm (Across from Admin)

28 Panther Parkway
Highway 63 N, Pecos, NM 87552
(Park at Track & Field)

The technical meeting is scheduled for Feb. 6-7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Jemez Rooms at the Santa Fe Community College.  Open to the public, the technical meeting will give participants the opportunity for in-depth discussions on plan components and the draft wilderness evaluation.

Please RSVP for the technical meeting or request additional information by contacting the Forest Plan team at santafeforestplan@fs.fed.us  or by phone 505.438.5442.

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